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Utah Restaurant Decides This Is a Great Time to Start Serving Kangaroo Burgers

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Even the least perceptive among us know that things in Australia are very, very bad right now. The bushfires that have been raging since September have killed at least 28 people and as many as one billion-with-a-b animals, have destroyed more than 3,000 homes, and have burned through 20 million acres of land. Some have estimated that as many as 20 species may be pushed to extinction as a result, and a ‘smoke halo’ from the fires now stretches all the way around the planet.

Despite all of that, a Roy, Utah restaurant has decided that this is still a great time to add kangaroo to its menu. Burger Bar serves a different exotic meat every month, and the owners didn’t seem to think that there was a compelling reason to change its January menu. “It shouldn’t offend people, really. It’s just hamburgers,” Joe Fowler told KUTV. “We’re not making a statement or anything.”

The restaurant had placed its order for the meat several months ago, and it arrived in Utah at the end of December. Fowler said that they “considered” not serving the kangaroo, but that they didn’t have the space to store the meat. Plus, he says that the meat order helped to support Australia’s economy.

In a Facebook post, Fowler wrote that the restaurant sold 400 kangaroo burgers in two days, and that the restaurant was currently out of its too-big-to-store meat supply. “[T]here is a chance we can get our hands on more, if the meat is currently in the States. We want all those interested to have the opportunity to try it, and will do everything we can to get it here, if at all possible,” he wrote.

“Oh, and a very special ‘thanks’ to the individuals and organizations who thrive on and/or benefit from stirring up controversy and outrage. As a result of your ‘hit piece’ and the most wonderful customers in the world, we have had our two busiest days in January on record!”

Burger Bar said that it would be substituting camel for kangaroo for the rest of the month. (“With the bombing in Iraq I can’t wait to try The camel burger!!” one of those ‘wonderful customers’ commented on Facebook.)

Australia exported an estimated 3,000 tons of kangaroo meat to other countries between 2016 and 2017, and the United States has not had any import restrictions on it since the 1970s. The only exception is the state of California, which reinstated a ban on all kangaroo products, including meat and hides, in 2015. Even in most parts of Australia, the sale of the meat as anything other than pet food was prohibited until 1993.

According to the BBC, Australians have long been reluctant to eat kangaroo for a number of reasons, ranging from its status as the country’s national emblem, to seeing them as roadkill, to memories of a TV show called Skippy the Bush Kangaroo, which made them seem like cute pets.

Burger Bar’s willingness to source kangaroo meat from other suppliers, and its enthusiasm for calling out KUTV’s report as a “hit piece,” are evidence that they’re not interested in humoring anyone who might not be comfortable with the timing of this particular special.



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Saturday morning bfast vibes… whole grain waffles with almond butter, nanas an…

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Saturday morning bfast vibes… whole grain waffles with almond butter, nanas and maple syrup. We used @vansfoods waffles, @krogerco Simple Truth crunchy almond butter and @blisgourmet bourbon barrel aged maple syrup. So delish… and tastes even better after a good night’s sleep. ☺️
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Our nights have been SO much better lately! Last night Olivia went to bed around 10PM, woke up around 4AM to eat, then she went back to sleep until 8AM. 🙌🙌🙌 So thankful for this flexible routine because with the feeding tube, her feed + upright holding (for reflux) would take about 1.5 hours and we were on a strict feeding schedule of every 3 hours to keep her gaining weight so even if she was fast asleep, we had to get up and feed her. It was exhausting. 😴 Now that she can take bottles we can do the feeding + upright holding in about 40 minutes and we’re able to follow her hunger cues in terms of when she wants to eat as well. Needless to say, it’s been amazing and we feel like semi-functioning humans again. 🙏🏼



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Faanoole and healthy food

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Reese’s Big Puffs… They Frighten Me

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OK, a lot of shit went down in December. The U.S. House of Representatives approved two articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump. The United Kingdom decided that it was still somehow OK with Boris Johnson, and it voted overwhelmingly Conservative in its mid-month general election. And Big Bird died.

Although we kept up with all of that, we somehow missed the release of Reese’s Big Puffs, an oversized breakfast cereal that seems to answer the question “What if ball gags were peanut butter-flavored?”

The cereal’s arrival was announced by The Junk Food Aisle, a true-to-its-name website that chronicles everything that happens in the candy aisle of supermarkets and big box retailers. At that time, Reese’s Big Puffs were just starting to appear in Walmart stores, and they’re expected to remain a Walmart exclusive for “the next few months.”

Reese’s Big Puffs are, as the name suggests, just a swollen-looking version of the legacy Reese’s Puffs cereal we’ve come to know, and maybe for some, love. Although the Big Puffs’ box promises that they’re “way, way, way bigger”—and the photo makes each Big Puff look like it’s the size of an artificially flavored fist coming toward your open mouth—it turns out that they’re roughly three times larger than the OG Puffs.

In late December, YouTube food reviewer Tami Dunn and her husband Kevin spent almost 10 minutes comparing the two versions of Reese’s Puffs. (“Oh wow,” Dunn said in her initial assessment. “It’s the same cereal, it’s just bigger.”)

Kevin was slightly more analytical—or as analytical as one can get when you’re talking about two bowls of cereal. “I like the Big Puff. I like the texture,” he said. “But I tell you what, you lose some flavor. Because you’re getting—think about the coating on the outside where the flavor’s at. I could eat one of these [Reese’s Big Puffs] that takes the place of probably four of those [Reese’s Puffs] but you’ve got a lot more surface area on on the little ones. So you get a lot more flavor. They’re still very good, it’s just not as high level of flavor.”

Although Tami and Kevin were slightly less into the Reese’s Big Puffs (“If you’re already eatin’ the Reese’s cereal anyway, then I mean, why not?”), they never addressed the most pressing question, namely “Why the fuck do these exist?”

The simplest answer might be “Because sugar,” and that’s probably the most accurate, too. According to Adweek, in the past three years, Post Consumer Brands and Mondelēz International have collaborated on five new cereal brands: Oreo O’s, Nutter Butter, Chips Ahoy!, Nilla Banana Pudding, and Golden Oreo O’s. Those five boxes of A.M. abominations generated $70 million in sales—which probably explains why they also released a Sour Patch Kids cereal last year. (Post has since stepped out on Mondelēz to parent a Twinkies Cereal with Hostess.)

“In the cereal category, the sugary stuff is actually what’s selling now,” said John Baumgartner, a senior equity analyst at Wells Fargo told the outlet. “Cereal’s one of the categories where people are splurging a bit more in terms of indulgence.”

Now we have one more sugary, unnecessarily large option to splurge on too. Also, maybe ball gags should taste like peanut butter.



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