Connect with us

Fashion

Sooner or Later, Zoë Kravitz Was Going to Be a Star

Published

on


One afternoon in January, Zoë Kravitz was sitting in a sushi restaurant on the second floor of a Los Angeles strip mall, but her thoughts were 3,000 miles and 10 or so years away.

Specifically she was thinking about her weed guy.

He’d come around with product concealed in a guitar case. “He would only talk in code,” Kravitz remembered. “Like, ‘Do you want a guitar lesson today?’ But then sometimes he would screw it up, and be like, ‘Do you want guitar?’ I’m like, This isn’t code anymore.

She was in her early 20s then, working only on and off, just another smart, young Brooklynite with time on her hands and a propensity for overthinking. She couldn’t have known it, but she was also doing research for her first headlining role, in the Hulu series “High Fidelity,” based on the 1995 lad-lit novel by Nick Hornby. Kravitz plays a Brooklyn record store owner whose life — and love life — is going nowhere particular, a part for which all those guitar lessons were inadvertent research.

“I did a lot of dumb stuff,” she said, but used a more pungent noun than “stuff.”

“Fun stuff,” she said, “but dumb stuff. And was probably a really difficult person to be in a relationship with. But I think maybe any 21, 22, 23-year-old is.”

Back in Los Angeles, the lunch crowd had mostly cleared out while Kravitz talked about living in New York, young and unfettered.

She wrapped her hands around a mug of green tea. She has the names of her younger siblings, LOLA and WOLF, inked across her middle fingers. Certain creepily comprehensive Internet sites suggest that she has at least 55 tattoos in total, many as small as punctuation. She wore a white cardigan. Her hair was cut short and pressed to her scalp in dark waves. Her characters often tend to say less than they know, forever side-eyeing the world around them, but in person she’s sharp, emphatic, easily moved to passionate outbursts by a piece of omakase (“Like butter. Like butter!”) or the two-decade-old “Seinfeld” where George builds a bed under his desk. (“It’s just so funny. Oh, man.”)

“One of the things I’m most proud of about the book,” Hornby said, “is that — I’ve realized this more and more over the years — it’s not just about me. It’s not just about people like me. It’s about way more people than I thought.”

In the initial script, the main character lived in Los Angeles and would have worked at a radio station. Kravitz proposed moving it to New York, and into a dusty basement record shop. Those choices, she said, helped determine other aspects of the show, like setting the story in Crown Heights, a part of Brooklyn where a dusty basement record shop and its owner could realistically survive. (Kravitz, who married the actor Karl Glusman last June, has lived in Williamsburg for more than 10 years, long enough to watch gentrification transform it; her favorite bagel shop is now an Apple Store.)

The staff of the record store now consists of two women of color (Kravitz’s Rob and Da’Vine Joy Randolph of “Dolemite Is My Name”) and a shy, gay man (David Holmes). When Rob runs down her top five heartbreaks in flashback, the list includes women as well as men.

None of this, Kravitz said, was about clearing some imaginary bar for wokeness. They just wanted a cast that looked real.

“I was trying to recreate a world that I know,” Kravitz said, “and that’s what it looks like. It doesn’t look like a bunch of white girls, like the show ‘Girls,’” whose portrayal of New York-area hipsterdom struck many viewers — Kravitz included — as demographically specious.

“If that show was in Iowa or something, fine, but you’re living in Brooklyn,” she said. “There’s people of color everywhere. It’s unavoidable. Same thing with Woody Allen — like, how do you not have black people in your movies? It’s impossible. They’re everywhere. We’re everywhere. I’m sorry, but we’re everywhere.”



Source

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Fashion

Summer Haul 2013 Forever 21, Target, Victoria's Secret, & more!

Published

on

Continue Reading

Fashion

Kingpins Transformers becomes Transformers Foundation

Published

on



The leading denim supply chain, Kingpins Transformers, has become Transformers Foundation. The foundation is a non-profit entity focused on actively addressing and facilitating change in key areas of the denim supply chain: social responsibility, sustainable cotton, responsible chemical management, and consumer education, effective January 1, 2020.

Kingpins Transformers was launched in 2014 as a summit series spotlighting members of the denim community who are committed to creating, implementing, and sharing the changes that need to happen in the jeans industry to make it more environmentally viable, socially responsible and financially sound. Transformers’ successful events in Amsterdam and New York, and a spin-off event for students that debuted in 2019 at Ravensbourne University in London, steadily gathered momentum and attracted innovative and notable speakers from across the denim industry and beyond.

With one foot in the denim design community and the other in the manufacturing arena, Kingpins Transformers has been bridging the information gap between the two, introducing brands and retailers to responsible and innovative new resources and giving members of the supply chain a platform to introduce new technologies, machinery, and systems. Now, as Transformers Foundation, Transformers is moving beyond education into action, according to a press release by Kingpins.

Collaboration and cooperation will be hallmarks of the Transformers Foundation. As a first step, the foundation will enlist supply chain industry leaders to join as founding members and create the roadmap for activities in 2020 and 2021. The Transformers Foundation will continue to host and broadcast its summits for industry professionals and students, and will expand its efforts into producing annual reports, white papers, consumer testing, industry honours for outstanding achievements, and more.

“Our industry cannot agree on facts or what is right and what is wrong. There is confusion and green-washing, misinformation and dishonest marketing along the supply chain all the way through to the consumers. Brands and retailers use resources when buying their products which are never replenished. Industry needs to understand and pay the true cost of a product, including environmental and social costs. And each day has new reminders that the clock is ticking and environmental change is needed immediately,” Transformers Foundation founder, Andrew Olah said.

Fibre2Fashion News Desk (GK)





Source

Continue Reading

Fashion

Ubuntu Fashion is coming up with "Girls and Wall"

Published

on



“Girls and Wall” di Ubuntu Group è in arrivo. È la storia delle ragazze che fanno cadere muri per creare ponti e legami.

Source

Continue Reading

Trending

//onemboaran.com/afu.php?zoneid=2954224
Мы используем cookie-файлы для наилучшего представления нашего сайта. Продолжая использовать этот сайт, вы соглашаетесь с использованием cookie-файлов.
Принять