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Plus Size Curvy Outfit Ideas- Gorgeous Fashion Model 2019

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Plus Size Curvy Outfit Ideas- Gorgeous Fashion Model 2019

Women Plus Size Value Fashion In Size 10 – 30. Refresh your wardrobe with our Plus Size Value Fashion collection. From day to night outfits, slogan tees and going out tops. Show off your shape in our leggings and jeans or show some leg in shorts or a skirt. Layer up in coats, knits, maxi skirts and jumpsuits. Here are our gorgeous collection of this week best dresses from size 10 to size 30. There are some short sequinned t-shirt style dresses perfect for the party season along with cute casual mini dresses that can be perfectly teamed with tights.

#Dailyfashiontips #Fashion #Plussize

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Music Credit:
Beta – Away (Inspired by K-391 & Ahrix) [NCN]

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8 Comments

8 Comments

  1. Orlando Sanches

    November 8, 2019 at 5:24 pm

    E di mas você gostosa

  2. Tuif Khan

    November 8, 2019 at 5:24 pm

    Beautiful

  3. Kontham Vinod

    November 8, 2019 at 5:24 pm

    Super sexy moments like you still l love you so much my favorite beautiful baby

  4. Эдуард Бахарев

    November 8, 2019 at 5:24 pm

    В кровати надо заниматся а не в фитнес зале он калечит а дуры ходят!!!!

  5. ARVIND JHA

    November 8, 2019 at 5:24 pm

    Hi beautiful yr dress beautiful in yr body ND hair so beautiful

  6. José Roberto Leite

    November 8, 2019 at 5:24 pm

    escultural vc delicia .

  7. Mike Sedillo

    November 8, 2019 at 5:24 pm

    False advertising. Where is the blonde?

  8. Reynolds Teixeira

    November 8, 2019 at 5:24 pm

    Linda

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Health

The COVID-19 Crisis Is a Trauma Pandemic in the Making

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The majority of the attention on COVID-19 has focused on slowing down the progression of the spread of this virus. The importance of “flattening the curve” to support our medical system has understandably taken center stage in the media. However, as a trauma therapist, I see a pandemic of another kind brewing as well, which isn’t being focused on enough. The social, mental, and cultural impact of going through a global pandemic will leave a psychological trauma pandemic behind. 

As we have been reminded in this situation, it’s important to be prepared for the medical impact of a pandemic. Our society also needs to prepare for the psychological impact of a crisis like this. Hundreds of thousands of people around the world have been socially isolated and have experienced dramatic and rapid losses in their lives, all while having little preparation for a crisis of this magnitude. We obviously weren’t ready for the medical consequences, but as a trauma therapist, I would argue that we’re not currently ready for the mental health consequences, either. The stress and fear that have come from this pandemic, along with the global loss and isolation required to combat this are the perfect ingredients for psychological trauma and even Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). 

When the dust settles from this crisis, almost everyone will be impacted. This isn’t to say we won’t recover. However, the impact from the stress and grief people have experienced in a short period of time will impact us long after this is pandemic has ended. 

The Foundations for Trauma During the COVID-19 Crisis Are There

The rapid shift people have had to make from a “normal life” to extreme uncertainty in a matter of days and weeks gave little time to orient and adjust to the changes that were coming. Even worse, people have experienced literal shock after coming out of denial, but have had to override their own coping process to perform for their jobs, families and partners. People are trying to show competence and confidence while they’re struggling. This is a recipe for trauma. When people override their emotional experiences, the odds of long-term mental health consequences and social consequences go up. In our field, we’ll see people dealing with relationship, social, physical and even sexual problems that are related to unresolved traumas from years ago. The symptom might not even seem related to the original traumatic situations.

Trauma is even more likely in this crisis because of social distancing. Obviously, I believe that people should listen to their local social distancing recommendations. At the same time, these requirements come with consequences, which can include leftover trauma. PTSD often comes from people doing the “right thing” at the time of a trauma. Sometimes we have to override or ignore our instinct to keep ourselves and others safe. Unfortunately, this also means that the experience is likely to leave some unresolved baggage behind.  

Trauma First Aid

Awareness, Connection, Self-Kindness, and Acceptance

You can give yourself a head start in your healing by focusing on these four things. First, practice being aware of your emotions. Although you can’t just let all of your emotions freely come out at any time, you can recognize when you’re overriding them, log the situation, and share that emotional experience with someone you trust. It’s amazing how powerful this can be and it decreases the chance that you’ll hold onto traumatic feelings after the crisis passes. 

Connection is required to navigate through trauma. In-person connection helps us cope with traumatic situations. Although we’re fortunate to be able to connect online, we also have to be real about the limitations of this. It’s helpful, but it’s not the same as in-person contact. Again, by doing the right thing and committing to social distancing, we’re having to override this important need. I recommend that people remain aware of the limitation, while using the technology while we’re required to do so. Then as the threat passes, make an effort to engage in social connections to help re-acclimate. 

People are often hard on themselves for how they’re coping with a trauma. We often downplay our own intense emotions and tell ourselves that we shouldn’t have them. Do the opposite. Be kind to yourself and accept the emotions that you’re having. Doing so will decrease the likelihood that these emotions will stick with you in a negative way. 

If you notice someone seems in shock after they have come out of denial, support them. You’ll be amazed at how much that can build your own resilience to trauma. We call this co-regulating in our field. 

Finally, it’s important to note that you can do amazing first aid and still walk away with leftovers from a traumatic time. Trauma isn’t about weakness. Remember, it often comes from us trying to do the right things in challenging times. The good news is that there are a lot of therapists out there who are trained in trauma who can help. Whether it’s first aid or problems down the road, trauma therapy can help. 

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How to Become a Fitness Model

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Everyone is busy. But considering what is at stake, making time for exercise needs to be a priority right now. Thirty minutes a day is not too much when you get right down to it. Cut one prime-time show out of your evening television-viewing schedule. Get up a half-hour earlier each morning. Use half of your lunch hour for a brisk walk. You can find time if you look hard enough for it.

#Exercise #Fitness #Model

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Restarting America Means People Will Die. So When Do We Do It?

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Emanuel: Yes, restarting the economy has to be done in stages, and it does have to start with more physical distancing at a work site that allows people who are at lower risk to come back. Certain kinds of construction, or manufacturing or offices, in which you can maintain six-foot distances are more reasonable to start sooner. Larger gatherings — conferences, concerts, sporting events — when people say they’re going to reschedule this conference or graduation event for October 2020, I have no idea how they think that’s a plausible possibility. I think those things will be the last to return. Realistically we’re talking fall 2021 at the earliest.

Restaurants where you can space tables out, maybe sooner. In Hong Kong, Singapore and other places, we’re seeing resurgences when they open up and allow more activity. It’s going to be this roller coaster, up and down. The question is: When it goes up, can we do better testing and contact tracing so that we can focus on particular people and isolate them and not have to reimpose shelter-in-place for everyone as we did before?

Anne Case: The idea that tables could be spread far enough apart that it would be safe to open restaurants — maybe that’ll happen in many cities, but it seems highly unlikely that sector will bounce back, which means there are all these service workers who are not going to find work in the sector they were working in. Losing that for 18 months, that’s enormous. Eventually, when the time comes for people to go back to work, I worry that some large fraction of working-class people won’t have work to go back to.

Peter Singer: If we’re thinking of a year to 18 months of this kind of lockdown, then we really do need to think about the consequences other than in terms of deaths from Covid-19. I think the consequences are horrific, in terms of unemployment in particular, which has been shown to have a very serious effect on well-being, and particularly for poorer people. Are we really going to be able to continue an assistance package to all of those people for 18 months?

That’s a question each country will have to answer. Maybe some of the affluent countries can, but we have a lot of poor countries that just have no possibility of providing that kind of assistance for their poor people. That’s where we’ll get into saying, Yes, people will die if we open up, but the consequences of not opening up are so severe that maybe we’ve got to do it anyway. If we keep it locked down, then more younger people are going to die because they’re basically not going to get enough to eat or other basics. So, those trade-offs will come out differently in different countries.

The Rev. William Barber: Even when we take the rich countries, poor people know from history that every time there is some great struggle, whether it’s the Great War, or the Spanish flu, or the recession of 2008, they are hit the hardest.

The United States has a whole lot of wounds from decades of racist policies and the criminalization of the poor. In 2011, Columbia did a study that we’ve updated: At least 250,000 people die every year from poverty in America. Now, in a pandemic, that’s an open fissure.



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