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A College Student Bought a $98 Plane Ticket Just to Get Chick-fil-A

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The small city of Troy, New York isn’t hurting for fast food: There’s a Sonic Drive-In, a Starbucks, a Friendly’s, a McDonald’s, a Popeyes, a Dunkin’, a Burger King, a Subway, a couple of Stewart’s, and a handful of pizza and sub shops. With all those options, most people might not even think about the fact that neither Troy nor its neighboring city of Albany have a single freestanding Chick-fil-A.

Should you find yourself in the greater Troy area with a craving for nothing but a Chick-fil-A sandwich and of course, the good luck to feel this way on any day but Sunday, you’ll have to travel 68 miles to the Chick-fil-A in Chicopee, Massachusetts or 76 miles to the one in Enfield, Connecticut, and driving either of those distances for fast food seems ill-advised.

Craving Chick-fil-A chicken just that badly but not wanting to travel quite so far, a group of students from Troy’s Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute figured out a pricey but successful Chick-fil-A hack, as reported by ABC7. The first step was to buy a plane ticket to Florida.

While the area lacks standalone Chick-fil-A locations, the Albany airport has a mini Chick-fil-A behind the TSA checkpoint. To get past that, members of RPI’s cross country/track and field team scrounged up $5.50 each to buy a plane ticket for RPI senior Vincent Putrino. With the $98 ticket to Fort Lauderdale, Florida—the cheapest the team could find—Putrino headed to Chick-fil-A, where he justified the whole ordeal by ordering $227.28 worth of food, including 15 sandwiches, 15 orders of fries, and exactly 156 chicken nuggets. With that in tow, he left the airport and fed his friends.

All of this, of course, seems a little much for a plain chicken sandwich served with an unfortunate side of homophobia. After all, Popeyes is literally right there.



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Sirusho – ARMAT series | #12 Lyon, France

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“ARMAT” documentary series is all about the Diaspora, our roots, our values – reflected through SIRUSHO’s eyes. Sharing with you her own experience!
Watch Now Ep.#12 – Lyon, France!

**
“ARMAT” (meaning ‘roots’) was filmed for over two years, as Sirusho was touring in countries with large Armenian Diaspora on her “Armat Tour”. In every country where she held large solo-performances while on tour (such as France, Belgium, the Netherlands, United States, Canada, Australia, Lebanon, UAE, Latvia, etc. ), alongside concerts, rehearsals and organizational work, her filming crew also captured the entire process of touring and visits, aiming to present the life of the Armenian communities and Armenians.
Each episode of the TV doc. series will be focusing on the Armenian Community in the given country, presenting the history of its formation, how they manage to remain so Armenian and stay true to their roots while being far from the motherland, how carefully they cherish the culture, how the love for the motherland is conveyed from one generation to another and how much of it is actually preserved.
Each episode will also feature local sights, as well as exclusive behind-the-scenes footage of the buzz in the backstage from Sirusho’s concerts in every country and her day-to-day tour life.

Follow Sirusho on:
Instagram:
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Facebook:

#ARMAT #Episode12 #Sirusho

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Doing the right thing – and benefitting the business

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Food Industry Consultant, Lesley Thompson, summarises this year’s NSF International Conference, which outlined ways to create and maintain a healthy business culture.

doing the right thing

The theme of this year’s NSF International conference, held at the British Library in London, reflects the growing movement across business, government and some parts of our community, to turn away from deterrence as the main tool to enforce compliance with rules. Instead, fairness, openness, encouragement and trust are being used as tools to encourage individuals to act responsibly.   

There has been a tendency in some businesses to regard compliance as an overhead. There is, however, growing evidence that suggests companies that ‘do the right thing’ by their customers, suppliers and regulators, benefit in many ways, including financially, and, perhaps most importantly, through business resilience and reputation.

“Compliance is an outcome of a healthy culture,” according to Ruth Steinholtz of Areteworks, who spoke at the conference. She defines poor cultures as showing the features of bureaucracy, short-term focus, hierarchy, blame, silo mentality, all of which can lead to high employee disengagement, bad behaviours, poor performance and even criminal behaviour.

The theme of developing and maintaining healthy business cultures in the food industry is very topical at the moment and within this ‘doing the right thing’ can be expressed in several ways. The event was held shortly before the Covid-19 shut down and this was, of course, rightly the focus of many operations and food safety executives at the event. The advent of this coronavirus has thrown into sharp relief the urgent need to government, business leaders, media and individuals to act responsibly in the interest of others and the country.

In this COVID-19 crisis, it appears that the majority of employees trust their business leaders more than government and the media to give the clear, accurate and timely information about how to keep themselves and others safe and to act responsibly in their interests. So, doing the right thing right now for business means showing leadership and effective and regular communication with their staff.

Building trust has always been an important facet of consumer-facing business. Through the 20 years that Edelman, the global communications organisation, has produced its Trust Barometer – an annual survey of 10,000 respondents across 10 markets – the priority issues for people have shifted from celebrity CEOs, through the need for trust in innovation, and in 2019 to competence and ethics.

Michele O’Neill, Edelman’s Global Strategy Director, explained during the conference that people worry about the quality of information they receive and the amount of false information, especially on social media. By and large government leaders are distrusted, while trust in scientists is high – even more so now in the midst of this coronavirus outbreak. Worryingly, no company is seen as both competent and ethical, although it may have some of these features. However, business performs better on these axes than media, NGOs and especially, government.

A total of 64 percent of consumer purchasers now see themselves as ‘belief-driven buyers’, ie they will choose, switch or avoid brands based on their stand on societal issues.

Sean Rickard, the well-known agri-food economist, argues that the right response in the UK is for our supply system to produce distinctive food products with specific attributes, not only taste and value, but also credence attributes including provenance, safety and sustainability, within a globally competitive, affordable, industrialised production system.

For the food industry as a whole, there is a huge and passionate debate going on between experts about the right path for the future. Do we create a world competitive food industry or develop farming as a land management industry and import more food? Is this really the stark choice?

The speakers agreed that more strategic and sustainable partner relationships between all parts of the supply chain are needed for the future success of the food industry. By working together, suppliers and retailers can create more value in products and better fit them to what specific categories of consumer require.

Andrew Fearne, Professor of Value Chain Management at Norwich Business School, believes that the more fairness a supplier perceives in the relationship with the customer (the organisation and the buyer), the more likely they are to go the extra mile to help deliver to the end consumer.

The regulators too are shifting their strategy away from enforcement and more towards education and engagement. During her presentation, Maria Jennings, Director for Regulatory Compliance at the UK Food Standards Agency, explained that they have changed the name of their current initiative from ‘Regulating our Future’ to ‘Achieving Business Compliance’ to reflect this.

There are many sides to ‘doing the right thing’ and much food for thought for our business leaders. Perhaps this coronavirus crisis will teach us all a lot more about what doing the right thing means.

About the author

With extensive experience in brand, marketing strategy and research/feasibility project work over the last 10 years, Lesley Thompson has developed in-depth knowledge of international food assurance, food safety, risk and supply chain issues. Lesley authors, edits and ghost writes white papers on these and related topics, as well as organising conferences. 



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Loaded Greek Chickpea Chopped Salad Great recipe from @cleanfoodcrush Ingredi…

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Loaded Greek Chickpea Chopped Salad 🌱🍅
Great recipe from @cleanfoodcrush 😊

Ingredients(4 servings ):
15 oz chickpeas, rinsed and drained
1/2 small red onion, sliced thin
2 cups cherry tomatoes, halved
1/3 cup pitted Kalamata olives
2 small English cucumbers, sliced
1/3 cup feta cheese, crumbled (I added a chopped jalapeno today for a little kick – totally optional!) .
Dressing ingredients:
2 Tbsps extra virgin olive oil
2 Tbsp balsamic vinegar, or apple cider vinegar for the extra health benefits
1 Tbsp raw honey
2 small garlic cloves, minced
1 tsp dried oregano
freshly ground sea salt and pepper, to taste
.
Instructions:
1. Place all chopped salad ingredients nicely into a large bowl.
2. In a small glass bowl, whisk together dressing ingredients.
3. Add dressing to the salad bowl and toss gently to combine.
4. This salad is great for meal prep as it stores perfectly in fridge for up to 3 days.
5. Make sure you only mix it with the dressing right before serving if using for future meals.
.
Enjoy! .
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👥 Tag a friend who’d like this ❤️💚💙


📸 All credits to respective owner(s) // 👉 @cleanfoodcrush 😍
.
#whatsonmyplate #trick #fitnessfood #fitfood #fitfoodie #eatyourveggies #eatarainbow #fitmencook #nutrition #eatwell #fitfood #mealprepdaily #hacklife #yummy #tip



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